Dragon Tiger 'sword fingers' position in movements 6&7

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David Zucker
chiwiz's picture
Last: 1 year 10 weeks ago
Joined: 6 Oct 2010

This falls under the category of: Experience something new no matter how long you have been practicing!

I took the DT online course to relearn the exercise from when I first took the class back in the '80s with Bruce ("Kumar" in those days) and found that the 'sword fingers' I had been using for years is formed differently from what I had been doing.

I think I got my position from the Yang style T'ai Chi sword form. I was holding my third and fourth fingers against my palm with my thumb (the thumb covering the fingernails of those fingers). My understanding from Bill on the video is that the position is formed as a variation on the 'beak' position from movement #2, the pads of the thumb, third, and fourth fingers touching; like a 'mini-beak' and the first two fingers together, pointing straight up. This is actually much easier for me. AND then I started playing with it - and here is my question....

Question: In movements 6&7 what points at the meridians? Is it the straight fingers or the point of the 'beak'? I was using the straight fingers because that's what I have been doing for years. But then I started experimenting by pointing the beak until the flick when I 'plugged into' the energies of heaven and earth at the end of the move , with the straight fingers of the hand (doing this with both 6&7) .

This feels more powerful, but as in many things in life, it could be just that it feels different because it is - well ,,,,,, different. It is possible; that when it becomes the new 'natural' that it will not feel more powerful. Although I have been doing it now for a couple of months this way and I can still feel the energy more powerfully doing the movement with the hands this way.

Advise please Bill (or Bruce), which way is correct?

regards,
David

Richard Shapiro
Last: 3 weeks 5 days ago
Joined: 6 Oct 2010
Hi David My recollection from

Hi David
My recollection from IT was the tips of the fingers that are the focus. I went back to the book, and on page 176-178, he talks about using the tips of the fingers, specifically the index and middle finger, to trace the pathways.

One of the things I like about how Bruce is unloading this material (there are many) is his writings. Since I've been studying w him, I'd guess that 2/3 of the questions he fields could be answered by going back to the text. PIMA in particular is like a dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia and ask Jeeves all rolled up into one.

The d & t book is similarly thorough and complete.

Hope this helps, and if I missed something, let me know, eh?

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